Tag Archives: Tips

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Patagonia on the Web – 17th July

Swoop’s roundup of all things Patagonian across the web this week.

Swoop’s Favourite Photographs:.

Patagonia-POTM-June-2014-Artur-Stanisz-620x422landscapephotographymagazine.com June winner was this stunning shot of Torres del Paine by Artur Stanisz from Canada

tumblr_n8upsqeke51sqdai9o1_500We stumbled on this picture on Twitter from  http://bonchant.tumblr.com/. Gives the atmosphere of what travelling around Torres del Paine is like with a fantastic view around each corner. 
3d47e68710a5f184a807256fea75272eLove this shot from the street’s of San Telmo found on Pinterest San Telmo, Test 1 by Moises Torne on Flickr

Swoop’s blog of the week:

obeliskManda’s blog about her unexpected trip to Buenos Aires really captures how great the city is even if you haven’t planned going there originally.

Read our very own Sally Dodge’s views on the vibrant city of Buenos Aires .

Swoop’s Article of the week:
Screen Shot 2014-07-17 at 16.42.44Great piece from Ben Lerwill on patagonia for National Geographic this month talking about his  trip in Tierra del Fuego.

If you are interested in this kind of trip take a look at our Austalis Cruises and our Patagonian cruise page to find an adventure right for you .

books

Swoop’s Guide to Patagonian Literature

There are many varied, exciting and truly captivating books about Patagonia whether they deal with indigenous history, early exploration, modern travel or historical fiction. We are strong believers that by reading a few key pieces of literature before and during your trip, it will change your perception of this extraordinary corner of the world and enhance your whole Patagonian experience.

This is by no means a complete reading list to Patagonia but is meant to be used as a starting point. We have chosen six books as “must reads” and then added some of our other favourite titles below. If you need any help in where to source these books or have any other recommendations then we’d love to hear from you.

books

6 tops pick for Patagonian Literature

                  • This Thing of Darkness (Harry Thompson, 2005) – the incredible tale of two hugely influential men – Captain Robert Fitzroy and Charles Darwin, the voyage of the Beagle and the plight of the native indigenous people of Tierra del Fuego. An excellent read for those that don’t want heavy history but a wonderfully told story.

                  • Of Love and Shadows (Isabel Allende, 1987) – written by one of Chile’s most famous authors, her 2nd book, set during the dark days of the Pinochet dictatorship, tells the story for two journalists prepared to risk everything for justice and truth. (See section below for other recommended Allende books).

                  • Mischief in Patagonia (H. W. Tilman, 1957) – an extraordinary story from a classic old British sailor and explorer of sailing the Atlantic, negotiating the Magellan Strait and crossing the Southern Patagonian Ice-field.

                      

                  • Travels in a Thin Country (Sara Wheeler, 2006) – a light hearted and entertaining read of travelling the length of Chile; the book also lends itself to giving gaining some background knowledge on Chilean history and culture.

                • Patagonia: A Cultural History (Chris Moss, 2008) – although quite heavy going this book is an extremely insightful and informative account of all things Patagonian from indigenous people, the Welsh to music and film and other travel literature.

              • In Patagonia (Bruce Chatwin, 1977) – Of course no list is complete without this classic. In Patagonia, although more of a literary phenomenon then something hugely insightful about the kind of places you’ll see in Patagonia, has some wonderful descriptions of characters and experiences.

Other favourites to be read and enjoyed!

Early exploration

            • Across Patagonia (Lady Florence Dixie, 1880)

            • Where Tempests Blow (Michael Mason, 1931)

          • At Home with the Patagonians (George Chaworth-Musters, 1871) – Muster’s own tale of travels in Patagonia and living with the indigenous Tehuelche people during 1869.

          • Voyage of the Beagle (Charles Darwin, 1839)

Classic Travel Literature

                • The Old Patagonian Express (Paul Theroux, 1979) – a classic.

                • Motorcycle Diaries (Ernesto Che Guevara, 1952)

Modern Travel

              • The Trail to Titicaca (Ruppert Attlee, 2001)

              • Thunder and Sunshine (Alastair Humphreys, 2007)

              • Between Extremes (Brian Keenan & John McCarthy, 1999)

              • Bad Times in Buenos Aires (Miranda France, 1999)

Indigenous History

              • The Uttermost Part of the Earth (Lucas Bridges, 1948) – a captivating account of the early days of Ushuaia and life amongst the, now vanished, indigenous peoples of Tierra del Fuego.

Chilean & Argentinian Literature

Isabel Allende:

              • My Invented Country (Isabel Allende, 2003)

              • The House of the Spirits (Isabel Allende, 1985)

              • Daughter of Fortune (Isabel Allende, 1999)

              • Ines of My Soul (Isabel Allende, 2006)

Pablo Neruda:

              • Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair (Pablo Nerudo, 1924)

Jorge Luis Borges:

            • Labyrinths (Jorge Luis Borges, 1962)

 

Buenos Aires Airports

Buenos Aires Airports

There are two different airports in Buenos Aires, and often people need to travel between them to catch connecting flights. We’ve put together some information and advice on the two airports and how to move between them, as well as some ideas on things to do should you decide to spend a night or two in Buenos Aires.

1. The 2 Buenos Aires Airports

Ministro Pistarini International Airport (EZE), also known as Ezeiza is 30km to the south of the main part of town, and is mainly used for international flights.

Jorge Newberry (AEP) is just to the north, and only a 10-15 min taxi ride from the nicest parts of the city; and is mainly used for domestic flights.

2. Travelling Between Buenos Aires Airports

Moving between the two airports can take 1 to 2 hours depending on traffic, and as customs and baggage reclaim can take a while we’d normally allow at least 5 hours between arriving into one and departing the other.

More info on moving between the two here:  http://blog.swoop-patagonia.co.uk/getting-to-the-airport-in-buenos-aires-by-bus/

Buenos Aires Airports

3. Spending the Night in Buenos Aires

It often makes sense for people, on their way into Argentina to fly into EZE, spend the night in Buenos Aires, and then fly south from AEP; with a short and simple taxi to the airport the following morning. Here’s a link to our most recommended hotels in Buenos Aires: http://www.swoop-patagonia.co.uk/hotels-buenos-aires/

4. Things to do in Buenos Aires

For a few more thoughts and ideas about things to do in Buenos Aires you can also read Sally’s blog post: http://blog.swoop-patagonia.co.uk/things-buenos-aires/ . Equally, should you decide to stop-over in Santiago then Sally’s Santiago walking tour may also be of interest: http://blog.swoop-patagonia.co.uk/things-santiago/

Patagonia Holiday Insurance: 6 Things to Consider

We’ve had over a thousand customers visit Patagonia now and would offer the following advice to anyone reviewing their holiday insurance for a trip to Patagonia…

1. Activities: Nothing out of the Ordinary

I’m pleased to say that 99% of the activities our customers enjoy in Patagonia are typically covered by a standard policy.

Most importantly, it’s highly unlikely that you will ever trek above 3,000m (or 10,000 feet), which is typically the threshold for many underwriters.

There’s an extract from our own policy below which shows the various different activities covered as standard, versus those where a premium applies.

A couple of things to take note from this:

- Trekking up to 3,000m is standard

- Cover for kayaking and horse-riding is dependent upon you wearing a helmet (all of our partners will provide a helmet, although you sometimes need to ask for one in Chile and Argentina)

I’m afraid to say that Patagonia hasn’t yet got into the delights of street luge, wicker basket tobogganing or ostrich racing but should you chance upon any of these do let us know!

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2. Patagonia Specific Risks

Much of the majesty of Patagonia derives from having the Andes running down the entire region from north to south. This is one of the most seismically active regions in the world. There are some 500 volcanoes in Chile of which 123 have erupted in the last 12,000 years. Whilst this presents very little risk to you personally, it does present a risk to travel plans. In the last 5 seasons we’ve had a few natural disasters including an earthquake with its epicentre to the north of Patagonia which resulted in a Tsunami alert (and subsequent evacuation of all coastal towns in Chile, including Puerto Natales), and a major ash cloud which effectively closed one of the airports for 3-4 months.

Ask your insurance company:

- What delay and disruption cover is provided in the event of a volcanic ash cloud, or other natural disaster?

- Do they offer an ‘add-on’ policy to include Natural Disaster insurance

3. General Travel Insurance requirements

There are obviously a number of standard requirements that every travel policy should include. For example here’s a standard package and the level of cover it provides:

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One comment on this relating specificially to Patagonia:

Luggage delays and flight disruption with the Argentine and Chilean airlines are, I’m afraid to say, not uncommon. This might be an area where you choose to upgrade to provide you with more cover.

4. Worldwide Cover

Patagonia, and the rest of Latin America, typically falls into the top regional band for insurance. To give you an idea of approximate pricing by the different regions.

5. Trip duration and age

Most people’s holidays to Patagonia are 2-4 weeks, which means you pay relatively standard rates (premiums tend to leap up disproportionately on longer trips of more than two months).

When it comes to your age this is also a factor. Standard categorisation is in three categories: under 35 years old, 35 to 59, and over 60.

Rightly or wrongly this is the first question the insurance providers will ask when providing you with a quote.

6. Medical conditions

It’s obviously incredibly important to declare any medical conditions you might have. Typically questions that they’ll ask shown here:

7. Getting a quote

If you are travelling from the UK

We have a partnership with Covermore. Contact luke@swooptravel.co.uk with your date of birth and travel dates (if we don’t know them already) we can ask them to provide you with a quote.

If you’d like to competitive quotes with other providers then we’ve heard good things about: World Nomads: +44 (0) 845 643 2642 & Direct Travel Insurance: 0845 605 2700

If you are travelling from the USA or elsewhere: 

Travel Guard: 1.800.826.4919 & Travelex: 1-800-228-9792

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Leo’s Winter Adventure in Torres del Paine

Leo returned in May from a Winter Trek in Torres del Paine. Here he tells us a little about his experiences on the trek, shares some wonderful photos, and provides some helpful tips for other people travelling to Patagonia in Winter…

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I completed the 3-day Winter Highlights trek with Swoop’s local host – Victor. It was a really memorable trek. Torres del Paine has both peaceful environment and stunning views in the winter.

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We tried to arrange trips to Calafate afterwards but we didn’t have enough time sadly. We travelled to Easter Island afterwards.

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The temperature is already below zero on the mountain but you are still warm if you keep walking. A walking stick is very helpful when walking on frozen land with slippery ice surface.

Thank you for helping me to plan this awesome trip!

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View from Cerro San Cristobal

Sally’s Walking Tour of Santiago

Sally has guided hundreds of visitors around Santiago over the last 8 years, and this is her recommended route for seeing very best sites of Santiago in an afternoon…

1. Taking the metro

The metro in Santiago is easy to use, clean, safe* and reliable – 1 ticket costing about CLP$500 (60p) will take you anywhere on the lines. These can be bought from manned booths in any metro station.

Take the metro nearest to your hotel to the La Moneda station on Line 1 (the red one). (When you get off the train, wait until the train leaves before leaving the platform, as the paintings are quite something). When leaving La Moneda station, take the exit for ‘Amunategui’

*a reasonable level of caution should be taken at all times to prevent pick-pocketing.

2. Av. Bernardo O`Higgins and the flag

As you come out from the underground you are presented with an enormous flag (find the flag then you know you´re in the right place!). This flag was placed here in 2010 to mark the Bicentenary of the Independence of Chile from Spain (in fact 1810 really marked the start of Chile’s war of independence against Spain as they didn´t gain full independence until 1818).

The avenue between yourself and the flag is the ‘Avenida Bernardo O’Higgins’ – commonly known as the Alameda – named after the poplar trees that line it. Bernardo O’Higgins, Chile’s hero of its Wars of Independence, had an Irish father and Chilean mother (hence the name).

3. Palacio La Moneda

Rounding the corner you will be presented with the Government Palace – Palacio La Moneda. This literally translates as ‘The Mint’ as it was originally designed for minting coins when built in 1805. In 1845 it became the government headquarters and home to all Chilean Presidents (although the President hasn’t actually lived here since about the 30’s). The building looks very clean and new considering the pollution problems of the city because in reality it is. During the Military Coup of 11th September 1973, the building was heavily bombed and much of it destroyed. During this coup, the democratically elected President at the time, Salvador Allende was killed (or, as some sources say, took his own life) and the military dictatorship ruled by Augusto Pinochet began.

Palacio La Moneda

4. Plaza de la Constitution & the Statues

Walk around to the other side of La Moneda to find the Plaza de La Constitucion.

Surrounded by trees and statues, this square is a great place to do a spot of people watching; also of interest are….

1)     The flags:  If the President is in residence there will be a flag flying above the palace with the Chilean coat of arms in the middle. If you pay attention you can see the Andean Condor and Huemul, a native Chilean deer. Surrounding the square there are also 14 flags which represent the 14 regions of Chile.

2)     The statues:

  1. Salvador Allende – complete with glasses, the statue of the ex-president shows his famous last words – “Tengo fe en Chile y su destino” (I have faith in Chile and its destiny).OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
  2. Diego Portales – at the back of the square, directly looking at the palace is Diego Portales; famous for writing the Chilean constitution in the early 1800’s that lasted nearly 100 years. He was assassinated in 1837 – if you look closely at his statue, under his right eye is a bullet hole which the statue received 11th September 1973; this is apparently the exact place where he received the shot when he was killed.

5. Wandering to the Plaza de Armas

With your back to La Moneda, walk to the far right hand corner of the park (the corner of Agustinas & Morande). Continue along Morande for 3 blocks until the corner with Catedral, turn right 1 block on Catedral and you will reach the Plaza de Armas.

To point out along the way:

1)     Café Haiti – traditionally Chile was (and still is) a great tea-drinking nation. When coffee started to be introduced in the mid 1900’s a new form of café was thought up in order to entice people (men) to drink it; these were known as the “Cafés con Piernas”, quite literally Coffee with Legs. Whilst city men came to have this new drink on their coffee break and discuss business they were served coffee by ladies in rather short dresses. Many of these cafes still exist around the city (of varying levels of nudity), the Café Haiti being one on Morande/Huerfanos.

2)     (Ex) Palacio de Tribunales – although no longer the Palace of Justice this impressive building, recently restored, stands proud in the centre of Santiago. Around the top of the building you can see crests depicting important Chilean laws – one to note would be divorce, not legalized in Chile until 2004.

3)     Shopping Centre – with the law court on your right, step inside the shopping centre on your left, a complete contrast of old a

nd new. Take note of the interesting use of an old façade with a modern interior.

4)     (Ex) Congreso Nacional – although the Chilean congress is now in Valparaiso, the original Congress building takes up 1 whole block (Mornade/Compania/Bandera/Catedral). Unfortunately you can’t get into the grounds but the gardens are beautiful with native trees from all over Chile.

6. Plaza de Armas

The Plaza de Armas was first laid out during the founding of Santiago on 12th February 1541 by Pedro de Valdivia and has stood as the centre of the city ever since. During colonial times it served as the military headquarters, into the 1800’s it was the place for the upper classes to see and be seen, and today it serves as a place for protests, chess, religious preaching or for children to swim in the fountain; a hive of activity and definitely worth some time to just sit and take it all in.

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To point out as you sit and watch:

1)     Pedro de Valdiva – in the top corner of the square is the statue of Pedro de Valdivia, Chile’s own conquistador. After a failed attempt by Diego del Almagro to reach the Chilean central valley, Pedro de Valdivia set out from Peru with is troops. After walking through the Atacama Desert for months on end, they finally reach the green, lush Maipo Valley where they decided to found Santiago at the base of the Cerro Santa Lucia.

2)     Cathedral – designed by the same architect as La Moneda, Joaquin Toesca, this cathedral was first built in 1748. (free entry).

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3)     National History Museum –  built in 1808, this building first served as the head quarters for the Spanish Court, in 1811 it became the National Congress and later the central post office; since 1978 it has housed the National History Museum since 1978, built in 1808 it first served (10:00 – 18:00; Tues-Sun; CLP$600)

7. Mercado Central

From the corner of the Plaza de Armas by the Cathedral, walk 3 blocks along Puente – be especially careful of cameras and your bags.

Built in 1872 as the central market, this British structure now houses solely the fish market and plenty of fish restaurants. It is alive with life, music and fresh seafood. This market was chosen as the 5th best market in the world by National Geographic: http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/top-10/food-markets/

8. Cerro Santa Lucia

From the Mercado Central, retrace your steps back to the Plaza de Armas, cross it diagonally to get to the corner of Estado with Merced. Walk down Estado for 2 blocks and then turn left onto 

Agustinas for 3 ½ blocks until you reach the base of the Santa Lucia Hill. Follow the path in – you’ll have to sign your name but the entry is free. As you go under the footbridge there is a staircase on your left – follow the stairs to the top.

View from Cerro Santa Lucia

When Benjamin Vicuna Mackena became Mayor in 1872, he set about to make major changes to the city of Santiago. He not only oversaw the canalization of the Mapocho river (the fast flowing brown trickle that runs through the city), but also transformed the Cerro Santa Lucia into the landscaped park that you see today; more than 1,000 trees were planted, and gardens and fountains built. The hill has the remains of an old fort on the top from which you get some great views of the city.

Stop off at the kiosk on your way back down, for a refreshing “Mote con Huesillo” – a traditional drink made of peach juice, peaches and pearl barley.

Follow the path back down through the park to get to the Neptune fountain and the other exit to the park (you don’t have to sign out). Turning right, you will see the Santa Lucia metro stop which you can hop on to take you back to where you started.

This tour will take you 3-4 hours (longer if you stop for lunch at the Mercado Central)

9. Do you have more time? My other top suggestions would be:

-Lastarria Nieghbourhood

Located at the foot of the Cerro Santa Lucia this neighborhood has been revitalized by artists who have restored buildings, quaint little bars opening and some new boutique hotels. For a great wine bar, check out “Boca Nariz Vino Bar” – more than 35 Chilean wines by the glass and a selection of up to 300 by the bottle.

-Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino (Chilean Pre-Columbian Art Musuem)

An amazing introduction into the indigenous cultures of Latin America from Mexico down to Tierra del Fuego. Inaugurated in 1881 and recently restored, this museum is famous in Latin America and located just 1 block from the Plaza de Armas. (10:00 – 18:00; Tues – Sun; CLP$3,900)

-Cerro San Cristobal & the Bellavista neighborhood

Between the Mapocho river and the San Cristobal hill is the bohemian district of Bellavista where you’ll find a mix students, artist, the after-work crowd and tourist all enjoying the delights of live music, street side cafes and local art. There are plenty of bars and restaurants but a few of my top picks would be, “Como Agua Para Chocolate” – great for steaks and fish dishes, and “Galindo” – great for reasonably priced local food, local beers and plenty of locals.

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At the end of Pio Nono you will find the start of the San Cristobal hill and the funicular station to take you up to the top. Exiting the funicular you will have to climb a few stair to get you up to the 14m-high statue of the Virgin with incredible views of the city of Santiago, the Coastal mountains and the snow peaks of the Andes.

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View from Cerro San Cristobal

Are you visiting Buenos Aires? Here are Sally’s tips on Things to do in Buenos Aires

Next blog to follow – 10  must try flavours of Chile

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Patagonia on the Web – 23rd May

Patagonia is all over the internet with bloggers, adventurers  and social media addicts posting all about their experiences and sharing their photographs.
Each one providing more inspiration for a Patagonian adventure!

Here are our pick of photos and blogs from this week:

Swoop’s Top 3 Photographs:

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 12.52.24This week the discovery of the ‘Titanosaur’ was all over the news.
Discovered in La Flecha, this epic creature could have weighed up to 77 tons.
Read more about this amazing discovery.

BnwI6N9CcAATX6kCopyright Worldland Trust

@worldlandtrust posted this great picture of a hairy Armadillo.
This picture was taken in their partners reserve in Patagonia.
Find out more about the Worldland trust.

BoHcj8sIMAAYxxFCopyright Arcteryx

A great photograph from @Arcteryx of @alpineartist & Marc Andre Leclerc on their latest climb in Patagonia.

Blog of the week:

25 photos that will make you want to hike Torres del Paine.
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Backpacker Steve has some brilliant tips ,videos and advice for independent travellers and has a number of blog posts dedicated to trekking in Patagonia.

If you want to experience the same kind of trip with the help of some experienced guides take a look at  Swoop’s trekking page. 

Iain Motorcycle Diary

Ian’s Motorcycle & Adventure Cruise in Patagonia

Ian returned in March from a Motorcycling trip throughout Chile and Argentina, during which he also took a cruise from Ushuaia to Punta Arenas. Here he tells us about his experiences on his trip, and in booking through Swoop and our partners…Iain Motorcycle Diary

What did Swoop do well?

Swoop were very helpful and efficient. They responded quickly, got in touch rapidly with people who knew the answers to my questions, and most importantly enabled me to take my motorbike with me on the trip.

What could we have done differently?

Nothing.iain cruise 2

How did you enjoy your Cruise Itinerary and Excursions?

The cruise was really good, there was always something to do and there was no chance to get bored. If anything there was to much to do and little chance to just admire the scenery we were travelling through (but that was more my fault for wanting to go to all the talks/presentations etc)!

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How were the staff and guides on your cruise?

Excellent. The ship’s crew were incredibly helpful in getting my bike on the boat and securing her. The expedition crew were all incredibly helpful, very knowledgeable and good fun.

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What did you think of the Cruise vessel?

It was modern, well designed, and very comfortable.

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Is there anything you would have changed about this part of your trip?

I would have potentially done a longer trip. We had very bad weather and so didn’t make it onto Cape Horn Island, or round the Horn. I’m not even sure I’d change this though, as it meant that I saw Cape Horn, a legendary landmark amongst sailors across the world.

I’m going to be able to annoy people for the rest of my life when they say ‘that’s a little bit choppy’, responding with “well, it’s not gale force winds at Cape Horn…”

70 knot winds at Cape Horn

70 knot winds at Cape Horn

What was the highlight of your trip overall?

Taking my motorbike to Cape Horn, and potentially having the most southerly motorbike in the world for a while!

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Do you have any tips for other people planning a trip?

-Do it, you won’t regret it.

-Don’t expect it to be a cruise, throw yourself into the expeditions, talks etc.

-Take warm and waterproof clothes (as recommended).

-Listen to the crew.

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Did you manage to visit anywhere else in Chile or Argentina?

Yes! My trip started in Buenos Aires, I drove down to Ushuaia, took the Cruise to Punta Arenas, then went to Porvenir, Puerto Natales (and Torres del Paine), Calafate (and Perito Moreno glaciar), Chalten, Carretera Austal, Chiloe, Pucon and am now in Santiago. It’s all been amazing but I think Chile might just be edging it as a favourite at the moment!

iain torres del paine

Why not take a look at Iain’s blog from his trip!

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Matt & Sarah: Trekking in Los Glaciares

Matt and Sarah returned in April from Trekking in Los Glaciares National Park. Here they tell us about their experiences on their trip, and in booking with Swoop and our partners, as well as providing some helpful tips for other travellers visiting Patagonia…

doherty 8How were Swoop Patagonia?

Excellent in every way, would recommend them to anyone.

What did we do well?

Everything!  Swoop offered expert advice and it was clear from the outset that you specialise in this area. They were very responsive, friendly and considerate – we typically travel independently but it didn’t take long to realise the benefits of engaging with Swoop.  I do hope we get the chance to return to the region and if so we’ll be sure to contact you again.

[Read more about How Swoop Works]

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What could we have done differently?

It sounds like a cop-out but genuinely, we can’t think of anything we would have liked to be done differently/better.

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How were our partners who supported your trekking in Los Glaciares?

They were also excellent – helpful, friendly, knowledgeable… great to have support from them while we were in Chalten too. Thoroughly recommended.

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How did you enjoy their itinerary?

Excellent – we worked with them to tailor the trip to our preferences and time available and it worked really well.  We were lucky to squeeze in Perito Moreno Glacier, a small trek on Viedma Glacier and 3 great day-treks… and spent time in El Chalten which is a fantastic little town.  I don’t think we could have done any more with the time we had available.

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How were their guides?

Pedro accompanied us to Laguna de los Tres and we really enjoyed our day with him.  We were lucky enough to have great walking conditions and probably didn’t absolutely need a guide, however we got so much insight into the area, local mountaineering etc.  He’s such a friendly and genuinely hospitable kind of guy with a wealth of experience in the area… if we ever return to the area (I really hope we do) we’d be sure to look him up!

Is there anything you would have changed about this part of your trip?

More time possibly to take in multi-day treks or head to Torres del Paine though that wasn’t really viable.  We had 5 nights and with the time we had it was perfect.

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What was the highlight of your trip?

Very hard to say but a close call between trekking to Laguna de los Tres & Loma del Pliegue Tumbado

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Do you have any tips for other people planning a trip?

1. Consider a guide for at least 1 trek; we got so much out of walking with Pedro.

2. Don’t rush it too much – we thought we were rushing but we heard of plenty of people with so little time in Chalten… the area is stunning and deserves more.  It’s a great place to hang out too.

3. Consider the weather – we were extremely lucky but I don’t think what we had was typical.

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Did you manage to visit anywhere else in Chile or Argentina?

We also had time in Buenos Aires and around Salta in the North-West.  From here we hired a car and saw some of the surrounding area… Quebrada de Humahuaca, Salinas Grandes, Cafayate etc.  All great and we’d thoroughly recommend it all – although Patagonia remains our firm highlight.

‘Once again a big thanks, I do hope we’ll be in touch again for another trip at some point.’

 

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Perito Moreno, Torres del Paine & Whale Watching

Rebecca & Carolyn returned in March from a trip to Patagonia during which they took a trip to Perito Moreno Glacier, followed by a W Trek in Torres del Paine, and a Whale Watching trip from Punta Arenas. Here they tell us about their experiences on the trip, and in booking through Swoop and our partners…

image[2] What did Swoop do well?

 Your suggestions were all great – perfectly aligned with what we were looking for on the trip

What could we have done differently?

Nothing

How did you enjoy the W Trek, Whale Watching trip and Perito Moreno hike?

All were phenomenal. The Whale Watching Adventure was a particularly unique and special experience. It was the most remote, relaxing (and educational!) trip I’ve ever been on. We spent hours on the boat sailing through the remote straits of Magellan, slept in tents on one of a hundred or so uninhabited islands in Tierra del Fuego, and for three days did not see a single trace of another human! It was an incredibly special trip that brought us into the depths of nature. All proceeds of the trip go to fund the research operations of the group, and spending time with the scientists, learning about their research and the whales, was a truly special experience. It was a very remote trip, and we were prefect for it, but I wouldn’t recommend it to someone who wasn’t comfortable spending a lot of time on a boat in rough seas, or camping in remote locations. That said, it was the most amazing thing I’ve probably ever done!

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How were the guides on the trips?

All great! 

Is there anything you would have changed about the trip?

Nothing at all. 

What was the highlight of your trip?

It’s hard to pick just one, but the Torres del Paine at sunrise, seeing  Perito Moreno Glacier for the first time, and sailing through the remote straits of Magellan were all pretty high on the list!

image[1]Do you have any tips for other people planning a trip?

Use Swoop and their partners in Patagonia! You made coordinating the trip seamless and stress free and allowed us to really maximize our time in Patagonia.

Did you manage to visit anywhere else in Chile or Argentina?

Not on this trip.image[3]